Cousins you didn’t know you had….

As a practically life long researcher, I have discovered that the more research that is done, the more likely cousins will be found who also share the passion of family history. And the wonderful thing is that they are all friendly and fun! The following expresses the joy in finding living family through researching those who have gone on before. Read More!

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Finding Genealogical Jewels in Court Records

Contention and disputes are not pleasant ordeals, but in genealogical research, we often hope our ancestors had some kind of legal disagreement which would have put them in the records. Teresa Barker discovered a jewel in the Lincoln County, Kentucky court records. A lawsuit was found in 1807 between Marquis Followell and Marquis Helm. Marquis Followell was trying to get possession of land he lived on that he believed belonged to his deceased father, John Followell. (Jewel #1 – the name of the father of Marquis Followell). Part of the story stated John Followell left the county to raise corn and while he was gone Marquis Helm took care of Followell’s wife because she was his sister. (Jewel #2 – the maiden name of John Followell’s wife and that she is the sister of Marquis Helm). In the body of the complaint, Marquis Helm was accused of keeping all the land since John Followell died in July of 1783. (Jewel #3 a death date for John Followell). Another lawsuit between Marquis and Abram Followell, heirs of John Followell, against Marquis Helm in 1810-1811 mentions a deceased mother and also John, Marquis, Abraham and William Followell.

Always check the court records where an ancestor lived because there may be a valuable jewel hidden among the dark disputes.

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Property in Wills Connects Three Generations

William Houghton, born 1727, was a schoolmaster of Prescot, Lancashire County, England who left a will in 1811 with property listed including offices, shop and school. His ancestry was not known prior to the find of another will dated 1734. This new will, dated 1734, was for William Houghton, shoemaker of Prescot. It stated that his property had been acquired from the “freeschool of Prescott” and consisted of buildings to which William had made alterations so that he could rent them out to tenants. This property was given to his grandson, William Houghton, of Prescot, watchtoolmaker. According to the Prescot church registers, there was only one William Houghton who was a watchtoolmaker living in Prescot at the time this 1734 will was made. The watchtoolmaker’s inherited property likely automatically descended to his heir since a probate record for the watchtoolmaker had not been found. The property named in William Houghton, the shoemaker’s will, is very similar to the property listed in William Houghton, the schoolmaster’s will, therefore the conclusion reached was that the correct father of William, the schoolmaster was William the watchtoolmaker of Prescot and the great grandfather for William, the schoolmaster, was William Houghton, the shoemaker, of Prescot. Thus, because of the careful comparison of two wills, this line was extended three generations.

Apryl Cox was responsible for this research

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SUCCESS!

SUCCESS! That is what we hope for when searching for our ancestors. There is almost nothing more thrilling than finding an elusive or previously unfound ancestor. Just yesterday, as I was researching some descendants of an ancestor, I came across a family in which the father had disappeared and the children were living with his brother. The mother was unknown and the family could not be found in a previous or subsequent census. The million dollar question was ”WHO was the mother?” Marriage, death and any other pertinent records were searched in pursuit of this Mom. Finally, I threw the names of the children out on google in hopes something might appear….. and, lo and behold, something appeared! An entire biography of the son of the disappearing father was on line and, yes, it named his mother, indicating she died shortly after the last child was born.

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This is just a short introduction to many success stories which will follow in our blog. They are not only fun to read, but sometimes help give ideas for future research.

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Price & Associates Inc
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800-288-0920
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